quick pickled vegetables sparkle up a plate at Le Chou Fou

Quick pickled vegetables are exactly what they sound like. You make a pickling brine, quick. While it heats and then cools, you slice some veggies paper thin. When the brine cools, you add the veggies.

Done.

quick pickled vegetables sparkle up a plate at Le Chou Fou

Jump to recipe.

Here’s why these things are genius: Quick pickled vegetables sparkle up ANY meal, and they do it fast. Planning a sandwich for lunch? Throw a few pickled veggies on for crunch, bite, and color. Add ’em to a bowl of rice and beans, or on top of some Asian pasta with nut butter sauce. You just changed the game from biz as usual to an impromptu party. Mix some pickled radishes into your salad bowl for a burst of sweet tart happiness. I had some on hand recently to top off the Baja Mole Bowl. Lovely.

My favorite quick pickle candidates are:

  • Carrots, especially the multicolored ones. Carrot sticks bore me, and I don’t like the way the carrot core so often tastes like wood. Slicing the veggies super thin and then giving them a brine soak makes them fun again.
  • Radishes. I’m crazy about those white/pink/purple radishes known as Easter Eggs. Radishes fulfill their destiny when pickled.
  • Onions. Raw onions cause stinky nightmares without a soak in some water. The brine perfectly mitigates their sulfurous nature.
  • Bell peppers, seeded and sliced.
  • Celery, slivered. You may also want to de-string the stalks, a tedious but worthwhile process if you don’t like having to gnaw through a tough old celery string.

You may be surprised that cucumbers aren’t on the list, but I’ve never really liked the texture of pickled cucumbers. So I choose denser veggies with a more intense crunch factor. Of course, cukes are the classic pickle base, and they make swell quick pickles if you don’t mind them a little less crisp. But cucumbers have so much water that I never eat them unless I’ve seeded and salted them, then let them stand until some of the water drains out.

For me, cauliflower is TOO dense, so I nix that, even though it’s a popular choice. I never eat raw cauliflower when it’s on a crudite platter, either, and it does seem to be left in a forlorn little mountain long after the carrots, celery, and peppers have been dipped and consumed. I’ve also seen pickled green beans, a great candidate in the crunch department. The problem is, they turn a REALLY ugly color. If this doesn’t bug you, go for it. Broccoli, for me, combines the density issue of cauliflower with the hideous color transformation of green beans. I’m highly visual. But as always, do what floats your boat, not mine.

While there’s nothing wrong with mixing the veggies together in the brine, I like to keep them separate and distinct. I would slice all the veggies, put them in separate containers, then pour the cooled brine over the top of each. You just need it to cover. If you run out of brine, it’s super fast and easy to make another batch.

Pickling brine scarcely needs a recipe, it’s so simple: 1 part vinegar to 2 parts water, with a generous pinch of sweetener and a discreet amount of salt. You can also add some mustard seeds or cloves or some other spice you like as you please. I gently heat the mix on the stove, stirring to make sure the sugar and salt dissolve, then cool completely before adding to the veggies.

As usual, I’ve included a recipe, but you really don’t need one. In fact, this is SO easy, teach your kids to do it and get them in the raw veggie habit for life.

Quick Pickled Vegetables: The Recipe

 

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Quick Pickled Vegetables
A super easy recipe for quick pickled vegetables that you can customize with ease.
quick pickled vegetables sparkle up a plate at Le Chou Fou
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Prep Time 20 minutes
Servings
cups
Ingredients
  • 1 cup water
  • 1/2 cup cider vinegar or other light vinegar of your choice (rice, white wine)
  • 1 tablespoon sweetener your choice of brown sugar, coconut sugar, maple syrup or another
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 cups crisp vegetables thinly sliced; see post for suggestions
Prep Time 20 minutes
Servings
cups
Ingredients
  • 1 cup water
  • 1/2 cup cider vinegar or other light vinegar of your choice (rice, white wine)
  • 1 tablespoon sweetener your choice of brown sugar, coconut sugar, maple syrup or another
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 cups crisp vegetables thinly sliced; see post for suggestions
quick pickled vegetables sparkle up a plate at Le Chou Fou
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Instructions
  1. Combine water, vinegar, salt, sweetener, and any spices you prefer in a saucepan over low heat; whole spices like mustard seed, cloves, and whole pepper work best.
  2. Stir the mixture occasionally over several minutes as the heat and stirring dissolve the salt and sugar, about 5 minutes. Remove from heat and let stand 15 minutes.
  3. As brining mixture cools, thinly slice vegetables of your choice: onions, carrots, radishes, peppers are all good candidates. Put the sliced vegetables in separate containers by type.
  4. Pour the cooled brine over the vegetables to cover. Store covered in the refrigerator up to 2 weeks. To serve, simply remove vegetables from brine, then add to sandwiches, salads, bowls, tacos, or anything else you can think of.
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